Sea of Thieves – Life As A Pirate Legend

To me, Sea of Thieves is as interesting a game as they come. Not because it’s fun to play – which it totally is, by the way – but because of its trajectory.

At launch, the core gameplay loop was great but it lacked variety. You were tasked with doing voyages for three unique trading companies, but catching animals for the Merchant was dull and uninspired, rendering nearly one-third of what the game had to offer a disappointment. Skeleton forts were a nice way to spice things up, but they were only active once every four hours. There was also a kraken, but it rarely spawned. As a result, most of the fun came from playing with people you knew and engaging with (sinking and robbing) other players.

But that wasn’t enough to tether people, myself included, over the long term.

I gave Sea of Thieves another chance about six months later though, and honestly, I haven’t been able to put it down. There’s now an element of danger behind every wave, be it from megalodons, skeleton ships, or the retooled kraken which now has a higher spawn rate. There’s almost always an active skeleton fort now. They’ve also added better merchant voyages and a section of the map with earthquakes, active volcanoes, and dangerous geysers that blast you into the sky. Even the simple addition of a rowboat has added a multitude of options.

These changes propelled me to keep playing until I hit pirate legend status. which, if you’ve played the game, you know is one hell of a grind. I’d wager it took at least 120 hours to accomplish.

And let me tell you, being a pirate legend feels good. Only 0.81% of players have unlocked the prestigious rank thus far, so strutting across the ocean with that title under my name instills a bit of pride. Now, it doesn’t mean that I’m better than you. It doesn’t mean that I have more powerful gear or weapons. It means.

Well, what does it mean, actually?

If you’re someone that will never put in the time to reach this pinnacle of seafaring badassery and want to know what it brings to the game…

I hate to break it to all the starry eyed dreamers out there, but not much, honestly.

The perks are mostly feel-good. People will comment on your title and compliment your success. Sometimes they’ll even invite you to play with their crew or shoot you a friend request. After all, it’s a safe bet that you’re at least semi-competent at the game, and that’s a welcome addition considering most randoms will needlessly use all of your supplies and sink your ship as a goof. You can’t buy that kind of respect in Sea of Thieves, but it can certainly be earned.

Being a Pirate Legend can also spice things up, as others may see your title and decide they’d like to challenge themselves by going head-to-head against a veteran. They could very well win, too, because it all comes down to strategy and skill.

You do come across annoying leeches from time-to-time though. Pirate Legends have access to buy Athena’s voyages exclusively, so as soon as someone finds out you’re one of the gatekeepers, so to speak, they’ll beg you to join their game so you can drop a voyage on their quest table. I understand why they ask, because it’s guaranteed to have valuable loot and the final chest will earn them some Athena’s rep. but if you have to ask, I ain’t droppin’. If we play for a solid session and you’ve been cool, then fine. but don’t just ask me out of the blue.

Once in a while I like to play Santa Claus, joining random crews and leaving Athena’s behind for them to do. Whether they succeed or not is none of my business. Their fate is their own.

Everything else just comes down to cosmetics. You can buy pirate legend stuff to wear and dress your ship with, but the real golden geese people want are the ghost items. Nothing says ‘I’m a badass’ like black threads which are torn and have green light shining through!

Of course, in order to reach said cosmetics you need to do a lot more grinding. As mentioned before, once you hit Pirate Legend you’re supposed to grind Athena’s levels, and what a slog that is. The best way to gain rep is to turn in an Athena’s chest, but you’ll need to do eight things on your voyage wheel before having the chance. and pvp is still a thing so there’s a good chance a poacher will try to walk away with it. To reach Athena level 10, you need turn in around 100 of these chests. On average, an Athena voyage can take anywhere from 2 to 3 hours. That’s. a lot. You’ve already invested well over 100 hours to reach Pirate Legend, and now you need to grind at least double that in order to get to the tippy top of the ladder. Just. yikes.

You can gain Athena rep by doing other things though, but unfortunately, they aren’t super-secret things that only Pirate Legends can do. It’s just a lot more of the stuff you’ve been doing all along. Destroy more skeleton ships, turn in more merchant stuff, turn in more captain’s skulls and chests, and so on and so forth.

So in contrast to grinding for Pirate Legend, going for Athena 10 doesn’t get the blood pumping as much. That’s because I’m no longer sweating every piece of treasure.

On the plus side, that means I’m finding excitement via other means. I’m now willing to run entire Athena voyages without turning loot in until the end, which is extremely dangerous. I’ll engage with enemy ships whenever, even if it’s my sloop against their galleon. I’ll chase a ship across the map for two hours if I think they have any sort of meaningful loot. Being a pirate legend has taught me that the greater the risk, the greater the reward. and I mean that in a ‘it feels good’ sense. Getting 5,000 gold from thieving feels better than earning 20,000 from an uncontested fort, because it’s way more fun. Is it a bit more crushing when you spin the wheel of chance and lose? Sure. But honestly, as long as the other crew proves that they’re worth the salt they’re sailing on, I’m fine with taking an L.    

So here’s my advice to anyone looking to hit Pirate Legend as soon as possible: Slow down and let it occur naturally. Just do what you want in the game. If you feel like you’re grinding and you’re not having much fun, then what’s the point? Put in enough time and you’ll get there in due time.

If you’re already a pirate legend but feel like your gameplay is now unrewarded, then look for new and exciting ways to have fun. Take some chances. Embrace the element of risk. Without having to rely on every piece of loot to get you to a certain status, you can be more carefree in your actions. This will undoubtedly prove to be quite fun. at least for you. Other crews on the sea may feel differently about your tactics. but it is a pirate game, after all! Nobody owns the loot on their ship until it’s handed in!

Happy pirating, everyone!

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Greatness Delayed Podcast #036: We Deserve Better

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Greatness Delayed Podcast #035: We’ve Got To Stop Taking Such Long Breaks

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Mike and Gus talk about God of War, Microsoft’s first party problem, Nintendo’s Labo and Switch cracking, and E3 wishes!

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PS+ Giveth, PS+ Taketh Away

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PS+ users are finally getting the hard hitting month of games they’ve been waiting for. Throughout March of 2018, people will have access to Bloodborne (PS4), Ratchet and Clank (PS4), Legend of Kay (PS3), Might No. 9 (PS3 with PS4 crossbuy), Claire: Extended Cut (Vita and PS4 crossbuy), and Bombing Busters (Vita and PS4 crossbuy).

People have pined for amazing AAA blockbusters to enter the program on PS4 for some time, and now their wait is finally over. There’s a caveat to this announcement, though, and it’s that the Vita and PS3 will no longer be part of the free games portion of PS+ as of March 8, 2019.

There’s a variety of takes on this across the internet, and many of them are predictably hyperbolic. Daniel Ahmad (@ZhugeEX), a respected member of the online gaming community, stated: “Sony sacrificing the PS3 and PS Vita so we can get good games on PS Plus again.” I think that’s probably part of their plan, but no, this wasn’t a move ‘for the gamers’, as Sony so often leads us to believe.

I don’t think anybody expected that the PS3 and PS Vita would get ‘free’ games forever. At some point, it’s no longer financially viable for a company to pay developers and publishers large sums of money to feature games on platforms that people have long since moved on from. We’re well past the halfway point of the PS4’s life cycle (we won’t be waiting another 5 years before the PS5 is released), and with over 70 million consoles out there (as of December of 2017), people are spending less time on last generation machines than ever before. So, why continue to support those old fossils with ‘free games’? This was going to happen sometime, and ‘now’ seems about right.

But there is another issue, here. Each platform had two free games each month, and sure, if you no longer play on the Vita or PS3, you probably don’t care about losing games on those platforms. However, many of the titles on those platforms were crossbuy, so PS4 users probably got about 4 games they could add to their digital library each month. Sony have clarified that in the Vita’s and PS3’s absence, the PS4 will still only receive two games each month. So, people are going to have access to fewer games each month.

And they’re excited about that?

Well, it certainly helps that Sony has dangled a pretty attractive carrot at the time of this announcement. “Who cares about losing the number of games you get each month?” They ask. “When you can have games like Bloodborne and Ratchet and Clank, that’s all you need!”

No wonder people are excited.

To be fair, Bloodborne is, in my opinion, the best game the PS4 has to offer. The fact that everyone with a PS+ membership can enjoy it now is great, but I’m wary about taking this as a sign of things to come. Sony have pulled bait and switch routines before. In case anyone has forgotten, Driveclub was supposed to be free to all membership holders, but that’s not exactly how things went down.

But let’s say that the PS4 will see a regular trickle of solid AAA games from here on out. Are they really spending that much more to get the likes of Bloodborne on PS+? No, it’s not like they’re paying off an independent developer so their game will debut on the platform day and date for the low cost of nothing. Bloodborne has been out for ages now, and most of the people who were interested in spending money on it already have it. So, now they can hook a bunch more people that may potentially buy the game’s DLC (as will the developer). After all is said and done, I’d wager Sony are probably going to SAVE money… at least, until the PS5 comes out.

Business is business, and that’s fine, but I think it’s important for gamers to have a realistic view of what’s really happening when a company delivers bad news from one hand while holding something shiny in the other.

YouTube Culture Is Out Of Hand

I just wanted to take a few moments to talk about the Logan Paul thing. I know it’s old news, and because he isn’t a video game blogger, the relevancy of this discussion may seem at odds with this site. However, I think it’s important to remember that this only happened a couple of months ago – which is like, an eternity on the internet – and we shouldn’t be so quick to forget. Furthermore, this story impacted the gaming community a great deal. A lot of our favorite YouTube content creators were compelled to talk about it because Logan Paul’s actions, much like Pewdiepie’s, ultimately affect their livelihood. So gamers all over have been subjected to this story and had to think about what they’ve seen and heard.

For those who have managed to miss this story entirely, Logan Paul went to Japan and visited what’s unofficially known as ‘the suicide forest’. He and his crew came across a dead body that hung from a tree, filmed it, brought the footage home, edited it, and then tossed it up on YouTube.

This hit extremely close to home for me. I often suffer with depression and my mind has certainly brought me to dark places. I know that when someone feels like non-existence is an answer, they’re at their darkest, loneliest, and most vulnerable hour. They wanted peace, and the only way they thought they could get it was by committing suicide. It’s an awful place to be in, and yet, Logan Paul thought it was appropriate to not even allow this person to find the peace they sought in death. It’s worth noting that Logan Paul blurred the man’s face in his video, but that doesn’t nullify the blatant lack of respect for this man’s most private moment. When I say ‘lack of respect’, I mean it. That’s not hyperbole. He and his friends were joking around in the body’s presence. I mean, did Mr. Paul really need to do a dab… in front of a dead body?

Oh, he blurred the guy’s face and bookended the video with a message about ‘doing this for awareness, so here’s a number to the suicide hotline’, but his attempt at sincerity falls flat because his actions didn’t back it up. There’s no mistaking that with this video, Logan Paul revealed who he was to the world: A callous ‘get those clicks no matter the cost’ worm.

And believe me, I tried to give him the benefit of doubt. When this story broke, I thought there was a chance that maybe, JUST MAYBE, the internet was freaking out for little reason. Groupthink often leads to hyperbole, turning mountains out of molehills. But no, the public outcry was well deserved.

I don’t fault Mr. Paul for wanting to film in the suicide forest. He probably likened the experience to visiting a haunted house. You know the stories, you know the legends, so going there can be frighteningly good fun. I mean, you don’t expect to go and actually FIND something, you know? Maybe I’m wrong, but I’ll grant him at least that much.

I will, however, hold his feet to the fire for continuing to film after finding the body. You could argue that maybe his nerves went screwy and he wasn’t sure how to react. I’m willing to entertain that, but what about everything that came after? He had the walk out of the woods, the ride back to his hotel, the ride to the airport, the plane ride back home, the ride back to his house, and the hours he undoubtedly spent editing to reflect on the situation. And yet, after all that time, he still decided to publish the video.

Either he was too daft to understand what he was doing, or he knew how controversial this would be but decided post it anyway (which is worse).

I’ve seen a lot of people brush this aside as, “Oh, Logan Paul just made a mistake. He’s only human.” But this wasn’t some slip of the mouth. It’s not like he forgot to pay a bill. He put someone’s dead body on YouTube. His audience are generally young people, and that’s not something they need to be subjected to. There’s no going back from that kind of a mistake.

But vlogger Boogie2988, being the kind and forgiving soul that he is, took it a step further. He said that while Logan Paul screwed up and needs to be punished in some capacity, he deserved a second chance. I can’t agree with that sentiment… like, at all. For really big screw ups, second chances have to be earned. So, Logan Paul could have taken some time off to make new content, showing he was going to take things a bit more seriously. Of course, he didn’t. He came back after a month’s hiatus, encouraging people to eat Tide Pods and used a taser on dead animals.

I don’t really have anywhere that I’d like to go with this. This piece was more to rant about the current situation with Mr. Paul than anything else. I’m really tired of certain people trying to defend him, or justify his actions in some way as if they were no big deal. It doesn’t matter if the guy had passed on and wasn’t aware of what was happening. What about the family? What about them, now that their beloved relative has been recorded and put on every corner on the internet?

This ‘oneupsmanship’ culture needs to stop.

Battlefront II: Initial Impressions

There’s been a lot of controversy around Battlefront II, and that’s putting it nicely. The gaming community has made it clear time and time again that they don’t want microtransactions or loot boxes in their $60 games, but it’s painfully clear these business models aren’t going away. We can protest as much as we want, but they cost next to nothing for studios to implement. Regardless of the (good) fight the core gamers are waging online, one thing they don’t take into consideration is that they are the minority. Casual gamers make up a pretty sizeable chunk of sales, and as Ubisoft has just proven – microtransactions are surpassing their digital distribution sales – they’ll subsequently spend money on microtransactions and loot boxes.

I’ve played some Battlefront II, and I thought I should share my initial impressions with you guys. Before I do that, let me be clear: I don’t like microtransactions and I don’t like loot boxes. I wish they weren’t part of the gaming landscape… but they are. Knowing this, how you decide to speak with your wallet is entirely up to you, but I’m going to try and help you make as informed a decision as possible.

How Prevalent Is The Card System?

Anyone who thinks they’re going to play this game and escape the card system are absolutely fooling themselves. It’s your primary progression system, and the acquisition of cards is done via loot boxes… and yes, you can buy loot boxes with real world money. But how terrible is this system, really?

EA needs to do a bit more tweaking, I think. There’s a few different kinds of crates you can buy with credits earned in-game, but the most expensive, and most important one is undoubtedly the Trooper Crate, which provides access to new weapons and abilities and costs 4,000 credits. Sounds like a fairly high number, and it is, at least a little. Each round of online play will last about 10 minutes, and sometimes you can earn as little as 200 credits, or as much as 400 (these numbers are based on my personal experience with the game, and they seem to vary based on actual in-game performance). This means that at the very least, if you’re a really great player, it’s going to take you over and hour and a half to obtain a Trooper Crate. Keep in mind, this is without obtaining credits through other means.

Along the way, you’ll also earn credits by completing certain incentivized goals the game has set up, and boosts the amount of credits you earn in a fairly substantial way. In fact…

Heroes

A majority of the discussion online has been centered around key characters, such as Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker, originally costing 60,000 credits. That’s an insanely substantial grind, and it was what ultimately made me say, “Nope, not buying this game.” After the backlash online, they’ve revised the hero costs to be 75% less, so Vader and Luke are now 15,000 credits apiece. I’ve probably spent 3 and a half hours in multiplayer thus far, and with the credits I’ve earned in game as well as the challenge rewards credits I’ve earned, I’ve already unlocked Darth Vader and I’m halfway to Luke Skywalker. So, the grind here has been pretty reasonable.

It’s worth noting that the game does have a number of heroes and villains unlocked at the start, such as Rey, Kylo Ren, Han Solo, and Yoda. Honestly, I wanted to experience these characters more than the others, as I’ve already spent a good amount of time playing as Luke and Darth in the last game. I’m not excusing the devs for gating characters in the first place, as it clearly shouldn’t have been done, but unlocking them doesn’t seem to be a chore… at least not yet.

Multiplayer

The beta didn’t shine this game in the best light. 90% of my playtime was spent helping a ship get from point A to point B, which was way too linear for my liking.

The multiplayer I’ve experienced in the full however feels much, much better.

If there’s one thing about the last Battlefront that was frustrating, it was that the previously designed levels, as much as I loved them, were probably too open for their own good. Stick your head out but a little, and someone’s going to start picking at you from a mile away. Of course, servers allowed up to 40 people to participate. I think games are up to 28 now, and the maps, while still allowing plenty of room to breathe, have been crafted a bit more carefully. They’re tighter, but not to the point of inducing claustrophobia. There’s a lot more cover when traversing from point A to point B. These are pretty solid improvements.

One thing you’re not going to see is Walker Assault… at least, not as you knew it. This time, Rebels must work their way to points on the map which have rocket launchers. Someone needs to pick it up, give it a moment to warm up, and then let loose. If they manage to pull this off before getting pulverized by the opposition, and the hit is successful, the AT-AT’s systems will be temporarily compromised, allowing your team to start draining its health.

I haven’t really spent enough time to determine what the balancing issues are, though, so I can’t really comment on that just yet. But overall, in some ways, I’d say the standard multiplayer this time around is better than ever, especially the Heroes vs. Villains mode.

The star this time, however, are the flying maps. Flying takes a little getting used to but feels great once you do, and the level designs are jaw-dropping. Remember that place from Episode II where all the clones were being made? That facility out in the rough ocean where the rain was pouring like crazy? You need to see this map in action.

Single Player

I’ve spent about an hour, hour and a half in the single player mode, and I’ve been having quite a bit of fun with it. One thing that’s an absolute strength is that they’re changing the method of play every so often. One minute you’re utilizing a flying droid to get around a rebel base, the next you’re running around going ‘pew-pew’, and the next you’re flying and dogfighting. I’ve heard that it’s a 5-6 hour campaign, so that’s not going to be worth the price of admission for most people alone. Thankfully, this new iteration of Battlefront is relying on a single game mode, and is offering a number of different options between the campaign, the arcade mode (pretty much Skirmish), and the numerous modes of multiplayer. This actually feels like a complete package (minus the loot box stuff, of course).

The arcade mode has a pretty stupid time gate on it, though, because the developers don’t want you to earn credits through it all day without ever touching multiplayer. They’ve said this is to prevent people from messing up the multiplayer system by earning too much too quick, but their intentions couldn’t have been more transparent. They just want to make sure you still have an incentive to buy loot boxes than to find an easily grindable way to earn them yourself.

Overall

Keep in mind that these are only my initial impressions with the game, but I’m going to echo what most other reviewers have been saying. Battlefront II, from a gameplay perspective, is a solid experience. I’ve spent more time these last two years playing Battlefront, and I see myself spending hundreds of hours on this game, too. Could it be better? Absolutely. Would I recommend this to everyone? No, not with the current progression system. I certainly don’t begrudge anyone for hating this game because of what the publisher has done. It’s a shame that stuff has to paint part of the picture as a whole, but it does. But for me, for my money, Battlefront II is a blast. I’m having more than enough fun playing the game as-is. Unlocking weapons through a grind was part of the last game, too, and microtransactions weren’t part of that equation. Now that they are… well, you’re still grinding for new weapons. Most of the additional weapons I personally couldn’t care less about… not in the last game, and not in this one.

Here’s hoping that EA makes more changes in the future so that more and more people feel comfortable hopping aboard, but as someone who really enjoyed the last Battlefront game, I’m extremely happy with the current product (as in, now that they’ve reduced the amount of time to grind for heroes).

Bethesda’s ‘Not Pay Mods’

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These days, Bethesda has quite the reputation. They’ve delivered countless hours of exploratory joy with The Elder Scrolls and Fallout franchises, and have published a number of successful games besides (such as Doom, Dishonored, The Evil Within, Prey, Wolfenstein: The New Order, and more). When it comes to making games that sell, they’re on top of the world… and they know it. That’s why they’ve recently launched the ‘Creation Club’.

The Creation Club is a way for Bethesda and third-party creators to make new content for games and submit them for internal review. This quality control ensures that whatever you acquire is actually going to work, unlike other mods which have the potential to make your game unstable. Because this takes time and resources for Bethesda to stay on top of, there are fees involved.

And it boils my blood. Not because of the money, but because of how Bethesda are positioning this.

The Creation Club idea may sound innocent enough, but Bethesda, in conjunction with Valve, revealed a non-curated approach to paid mods back in 2015, and the internet, rightfully so, had exploded in anger. You don’t start to sell something that’s been free since the dawn of (gaming) time. Just because Microsoft and Sony have added paywalls to online access, doesn’t mean it’s a free-for-all out there.

PC gamers love that particular platform because it gives them endless possibilities which consoles aren’t capable of. Mods have ranged from skins to full blown gameplay expansions, and best of all, it was free. Every bit of it. It’s content that’s been created by and for fans because they’re passionate enough to do so, not because they want to make a quick buck. Some of the more well-known modders have Patreons if you’d like to donate some money out of sheer appreciation, but their content remains free.

But hey, leave it to Bethesda to monetize something that’s free. Because, you know… Bethesda.

Fortunately, the outrage was enough to cause the publisher to cancel their plans a week after announcing them.

And now here comes the Creation Club, a thinly veiled attempt at reintroducing paid mods. And I say thinly veiled because Bethesda are position this as… actually, let me rephrase this. They’ve flat out denied that the Creation Club is a paid mods platform:

“Is Creation Club paid mods?”

No. Mods will remain a free and open system where anyone can create and share what they’d like. Also, we won’t allow any existing mods to be retrofitted into Creation Club, it must all be original content. Most of the Creation Club content is created internally, some with external partners who have worked on our games, and some by external Creators. All the content is approved, curated, and taken through the full internal dev cycle; including localization, polishing, and testing. This also guarantees that all content work together. We’ve looked at many ways to do “paid mods”, and the problems outweigh the benefits. We’ve encountered many of those issues before. But, there’s a constant demand from our fans to add more official high quality content to our games, and while we are able to create a lot of it, we think many in our community have the talent to work directly with us and create some amazing new things.”

Yeah, that all sounds well and good, but it stinks. It stinks because it doesn’t make any damn sense. In the Creation Club, you have to buy virtual currency with real world money, and then use that digital currency to purchase mods.

Sounds an awful lot like paid mods, doesn’t it? I mean, you’re giving them money, and you’re getting mods in return, right? Yeah. That’s because they’re paid mods.

As mentioned earlier, Bethesda tried to pull this nonsense a couple of years ago. Valve asked Bethesda if they’d be open to a paid mods thing, Bethesda said ‘you’re damn right we are’, and fans shut them down. Instead of taking the hint that gamers want nothing to do with paid mods, they shelved the idea for a couple of years so they could come up with a fancy name and some bullshit PR babble, hoping people wouldn’t notice that the paid mods idea didn’t actually go away, but was just retooled.

Lying to fans and customers is about the most despicable thing a company can do. It tells us they have the bravado to say whatever, and do whatever they want because they think we’re too stupid to read between the lines. But we aren’t, and video game journalists haven’t been either. Most headlines in regards to the Creation Club are some iteration of, ‘Bethesda Introduces Paid Mods!’ Say what you will about gaming journalists, but at least they call a spade a spade when crap like this comes up.

Fortunately, Bethesda has made it clear that free mods will still be allowed, but considering how backhanded they’re being with the announcement of their Creation Club, but again, they’re full of crap. They have absolutely screwed over the whole ‘free mods’ thing.

The Creation Club update is mandatory, and when it went live, it changed at least one game’s .exe file, causing F4SE (a script extender which is essential for many mods) to stop working. Script extenders pretty much need to be updated each time the game updates, but assuming the Creation Club files will be updated on a regular basis, that’s going to turn into a full time job for community modders, which may only incentivize them to quit.

And by the way, when I say the Creation Club update is mandatory, that includes all the content available through it. Yep, you’re going to have a lot of useless crap on your hard drive, and there’s not much you can do about it. Some have theorized that Bethesda are doing this to get around Sony’s rules about 3rd party content by wrapping it all into the game itself, but that’s hardly a good solution. In fact, it’s fucking terrible. Why would this affect PC and Xbox One users, then? A 2.1 GB update shouldn’t be forced down anyone’s throat if it’s not vital to run the game.

Furthermore, the Creation Club is breaking people’s free mods… mods which worked perfectly fine before the update. This is because mod load order – which is essential for ensuring everything loads properly and plays nicely with each other – is being affected. Mods are now forced to load in alphabetical order, meaning your free mods aren’t going to work. I’ll assume this is a bug, but you never know.

Last but certainly not least, it seems Pipboy skins refuse to work with any other free mod installed. Once other free mods are removed, the Pipboy skins will work.

I normally don’t condone piracy unless it’s firmly authorized by the devs, but you know what? Go for it. You can use all this new content for free because it’s easily crackable. Unpack the Creation Club .BSA, rename it, and then run the game. Tada! You have all the Creation Club content for free!

Except it’s all boring as piss, and all the free stuff is better.

Another way around this is to, if you haven’t updated through Steam yet, to use F4SE.exe to open the game exclusively, and tell Steam to not update the game unless you launch it (directly from Steam). That way you’ll never have to worry about updating the game when you don’t want to.

I won’t get into the whole ‘slippery slope’ discussion, because I know that’s an anecdotal part of the conversation at best. Still, there is precedence for other companies to follow suit when an idea bears fruit (money) for someone else… and that’ll be the worst if it happens. Just the absolute fucking worst.

After all is said and done, Bethesda probably would have garnered more respect and less outrage if they had just announced this program like this:

“Hello! We’re introducing the Creation Club, a place where you can buy first and third party created mods. These paid mods will mostly come from you, and you can submit them to us for internal review, and as long they pass our qualitative standards, they’ve be available from the Creation Club shop and you can earn a bit of money, too!” That still doesn’t make the whole thing about breaking free mods any better though, especially since they said free mods were still OK.

Telling the truth is groundbreaking shit, I know. But, no, we got two lies here for the price of one. They ARE paid mods and free mods ARE being affected.  Period. Here’s to hoping the backlash online causes Bethesda to once again rethink their position on paid DLC, because this isn’t going to end well for them.