GOG Lays Off 10 Percent Of Its Staff

Well, that was unexpected.

GOG have just let go of at least a dozen staff members. That may not sound like much compared to the 800 or so that were blown out by Activision Blizzard, but really, they’re close percentage wise (this is 10% compared to Acti-Blizz’s 8%).

How could this be? Isn’t GOG the darling of PC gamers everywhere? Doesn’t CD Projekt practically print their own money?

Apparently not. Kotaku’s Jason Schreier was told by someone on the inside that the company’s revenue wasn’t able to keep up with growth, so they were dangerously close to being in the red over the last few months. As a result, a tough financial decision had to be made and here we are.

It’s also come to light that GOG’s Fair Price Package program is coming to a close at the end of March. For those out of the loop, this package:

“…is a form of store credit, which we give back when you buy a regionally priced game that is more expensive in your region, compared to most other regions.

“So, if you buy a game for 40 Euro (so roughly 45 USD), but the same game costs 40 USD in the United States and most other regions, we give you the 4 USD difference back, in store credit.”

It’s great that GOG were making up the difference themselves, but now that they’re giving developers a larger cut of each sale, they needed to ensure they could still turn a profit. Something had to give.  

I hope more information comes to light, because we know next to nothing. Only one source that we know of has stepped forward with nitty gritty details. That source painted a doom and gloom scenario, but I’m not entirely sold on it, not yet. I want to see more ‘confirmation’ of the company being in dire straits, because they could lay people off for a number of reasons. Maybe they’re changing direction? With the way the market is changing, it’s a possibility. Despite the 8% cut in staff, the company still has 20 open positions. Why?

Anyway, the knee-jerk reaction online is that this was inevitable. There are people who believe it’s stupid to sell DRM-free games, because all it takes is a single person to add those game files to a torrent and then nobody will be incentivized to pay for it. I believe this has to impact sales at least a little, but studies have shown that piracy doesn’t really hurt a studio’s bottom line. Basically, the people who pirate a game were never going to buy it in the first place, so no harm, no foul. Again, I take issue with this, but I’m not going to argue against research.

GOG believe that best way to combat piracy is by earning good will. The company once told Fraghero.com:

“… our closest digital competitor is piracy. And they’re even bigger than Steam.

“We’re not necessarily a competitor for Steam. We’re an alternative. We provide things they don’t – namely, a DRM-free experience, flat pricing world-wide, and goodies and attention to our games and gamers. They provide things that we don’t. Many of the games that we sell are available on Steam as well, and the fact that we do as well as we have in the last year proves that some people find what we’re doing a valuable alternative to Steam.” “So with that said, the fact that we’ve taken the no-DRM approach makes a lot of sense if you think about who it is that we consider as the largest ‘digital distributor’ in the market: pirates. We’ve deliberately designed our signup, purchase, and download process to be as quick and painless as possible, because if you compare the process of buying a game with DRM to downloading the game from a torrent, the stark difference in simplicity and user-friendliness is boggling,” Trevor Longino, PR Head of GOG.com (at the time) explained.

And this wasn’t just GOG slinging bullshit, either. When CD Projekt RED released The Witcher 3, the company put their money where their mouth is, and it paid off handsomely .

“We released [The Witcher 3] without any copy protection. So, on day one, you could download the game from GOG, and give it to a friend (enemy as well)… and still we sold near to 10 million units across all 3 platforms.”

“We don’t like when people steal our product, but we are not going to chase them and put them in prison. But we’ll think hard what to make to convince them. And uh, convince them in a positive way, so that they’ll buy the product next time, they’ll be happy with our game, and they’ll tell their friends not to pirate it.” -Marcin Iwinski (2016, per Kotaku)

So if piracy isn’t impacting their bottom line, why is this company letting go of people and ending one of the greatest good will assets they’ve had (the Fair Price Package program)?

Well, the industry is changing.

While selling DRM-free games is awesome, that ideology only serves a niche market. People are content using Steam because it hosts virtually everything and it’s where everyone has always bought their games from. Sure, it’s ideal to actually own the products you spend money on, but GOG isn’t an attractive option. That may sound like blasphemy to some, but it is what it is.

Downloading installers and storing them on a hard drive is a tough sell these days. Your personal library in Steam allows you to download and uninstall games whenever you want and will store your save files in the cloud. Redownloading a game means you won’t start over from scratch. Yes, you can hold on to your save files in a folder on the PC, but there’s something to be said about convenience. “But managing your files is as simple as clicking and dragging,” you might say, but keep in mind that the average consumer merely wants a ‘plug and play’ experience. If you just go with individual installer packages for each game, you won’t get that. You can rectify the problem by using GOG’s launcher, but if you’re going to do that, then again, you already have Steam and probably want to keep your library there.

Steam also has an achievements system and automatic updates. GOG’s launcher incorporates similar features, but there’s other reasons why people are dissuaded from buying stuff through their store.

GOG doesn’t offer all the games that people want. If you’re looking for a brand spankin’ new AAA title, chances are that GOG won’t have it. Publishers want to protect their investments, so they very much want DRM attached to their games. For the games GOG does have, post-launch support does have a tendency to lack. Game features have had, at times, to be removed from the GOG version (when Steamworks is involved, sometimes publishers don’t want to waste resources for parity on other digital platforms). There’s nothing more frustrating than seeing patches get released on platforms like Steam, only to wonder when, if ever, you’ll see it show up on GOG. That’s more on the developer/publisher, but still, it’s something consumers have to take into consideration.

That’s not to say that everything about GOG is a horror show, because things can also work the other way. There are times where games on GOG have included patches, even ones produced my members of the gaming community, in order to sell the best possible product. Steam, on the other hand, requires you to find and install said fixes on your own.

Still, all things considered, when compared to Steam, GOG isn’t what most people are looking for. That, ultimately, is the crux of their problem.

And now that they’ve dropped the Fair Price Package plan, even less people will be inclined to go there. Why’d they do this in the first place? Because they have little choice with the competition out there. The Epic Games Store has made a decent splash by promising developers a larger percentage of game sales than Steam will provide. GOG probably felt they had little choice but to head down the same path, and it’s going to hurt them.

I wouldn’t freak out and start downloading everything you’ve purchased from GOG anytime soon, but it’ll be interesting to see how the company plans to remain relevant moving forward. DRM-free gaming is an awesome thing to have in the marketplace, but again, it’s rather niche, and with digital platforms being easier than ever to use (like Steam), the whole ‘it’s easier than pirating’ shtick isn’t unique.

The only thing GOG really has going for it in 2019, is that you can buy many of yesteryear’s best games, and with a launcher that ensures it’ll run on your modern operating system without (much) issue… but will that be enough? Only time will tell.

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Epic Games Store’s Metro Exo-Duh – How Bad Is It

You may have heard that Epic Games – yeah, the Fortnite company – has launched its own storefront and is looking to compete directly against Valve. Good news, right?

Well, it depends who you ask.

People have been collecting games on Steam for what feels like an eternity, so to them, it feels like home. That’s where most my PC games are stored, by the way, so I understand the sentiment. To have all of your games collected under a single launcher means there’s no fuss, so people who have more games than they could ever play in a single lifetime – courtesy of those lovely Steam sales, no doubt – will want to see that platform thrive for decades to come.

But anyone who’s being honest with themselves will admit that Steam isn’t what it used to be.

Steam was once heralded for being as consumer friendly as a company could get. Valve was a development studio that knew how to sell games to gamers and they’ve built an empire around that. Steam sales used to feature prices so low that people would practically empty their bank accounts. Taking advantage of those insanely good prices was well worth it, even if it meant living off dehydrated noodles for the next three months.

But along the way, things have changed.

Every time there’s a Steam sale these days, all I see is a swath of people complaining about the selection of titles and the not-so-great pricing (personally, I think sales prices are fine, but I know they don’t hold a candle to the Steam sales of yore). So naturally, people have wished some competition would come along and force Valve to react accordingly, which is understandable because nobody loves a monopoly.

Well, Epic Games seems to be the first real contender… and now people are revolting?

To be fair, there’s more to this story than ‘some company is finally trying to give Valve a run for their money.’ Epic Games understood that the only way they’d make a splash in an era dominated by Steam is if they spent a lot of money upfront. As a result, they’ve opened their platform by offering a variety of free games – Subnautica, Super Meat Boy, and Axiom Verge kicked things off admirably – giving developers a larger cut of sales revenue, and by spending money on exclusive games.

That latter point is where things begin to get a little crazy.

Metro Exodus is one of the hottest anticipated titles in Q1 of 2019, but less than a month prior to its release, it was announced that it would be an Epic Games Store exclusive – only on PC, as the console launch will go as planned – for one year. Steam pre-orders will still be honored – meaning it will be available for download on that platform for those that bought the game ahead of time – but anyone who missed out will need to get it on the Epic Games Store. Because of the devs larger slice in the sales pie, the game will only cost $50 as opposed to the usual $60.

The gaming community is largely split on the matter.

The primary complaint I’ve seen is that it isn’t fair for certain games to be kept off Steam.

Personally, I’m a strong supporter of businesses doing what they want, because consumers are ultimately going to decide if their tactics were viable or not.

But why are gamers pretending like they’ve never had a supplemental launcher to install? If you want to play Overwatch, Diablo III, or the upcoming Warcraft III remaster/reimagining, you’ll need Blizzard’s launcher. If you like EA games, Origin is mandatory. GoG hosts a veritable wealth of classic games that aren’t available anywhere else, so that’s yet another platform to download (this one is optional though, as GoG also allows you to download game installation packs on their own, as their sales model supports DRM free gaming first and foremost). Anyone who feels like the Epic Games Store is the first affront on having every game they’ll ever own on Steam, they’re kidding themselves.

Granted, there is a difference; the above mentioned launchers are not competing against Steam directly, whereas Epic is. Is that distinction meaningful enough though? If the core complaint is ‘it’s not fair and I want my entire library in one place,’ then I’d say not. Things haven’t been that way for a very long time.  

And besides, Steam allows you to link games from other platforms to your library anyway, so everything can still be on one tidy list. The other game’s launcher will still come into play, but as previously noted, that’s been a non-issue for most. I mean, how many people opted out of getting GTA V on PC just because Rockstar have their own launcher for it? Not many, because that game has been its own money press and continues to be to this day.

For some, it’s not a matter of convenience but more about not wanting to waste ‘valuable’ hard drive space and system resources. Why have five launchers when the gaming industry could just have everything on one, you know?

Fact of the matter is that most, if not all of the available platforms won’t impact game performance unless your hardware is extremely outdated. If running the Epic Store is going to be a burden, that’s not the fault of the program but the limitations of your PC.

Other gamers don’t want the Epic Games Store just on principle. One common concern is that the ‘snatch up exclusives’ mentality is bringing a console-wars-like battle to a community that has largely managed to avoid it.

But have they, really?

People have been arguing over Nvidia and AMD for years. Intel vs AMD. Windows vs Linux. And yet, PC gamers believe that they have isolated themselves from the woes of console gaming, even though they’ve been neck deep in similar problems all along. It’s selective (with a dash of elitist) memory at its finest.

The only real issue I see with the Epic Games Store is that the $10 discount only applies to the United States. Not only that, but reports indicate that the game actually costs more than it should in other regions. That’s a problem, and Epic really need to hammer that out if they don’t want their platform to become a niche market that ultimately fades into obscurity.

I have lingering questions about that $50 price tag anyway. Is that discount really the result of the larger cut that go to the devs, or is it just a PR move that Epic paid additional money for? Unless all platform exclusives adopt a similar pricing model moving forward, I don’t see this as a long-term win. This is just to get people on the platform, period… but Epic now have a mountain to climb in ensuring they grow and maintain a loyal consumer base.

That’ll be quite some burden to bear, I’m sure.

There’s also been some chatter about how Epic has had some data breaches in the past so people won’t trust them. But Valve has had data breaches too. And Microsoft. And Sony. If you’re going to hold one company’s feet to the fire for this, you’ll have to do it for all. It’s 2019, and data breaches are just a part of our day-to-day lives. Your information can be compromised at hotels, gas stations, restaurants, retail shops, and more.

Everything taken into account, I think people are just unhappy with seeing another platform pull games away from Steam. They feel it’s underhanded for Epic to pony up money for exclusivity, and that they should earn customers by being a better platform with better features.

That’s how things would be in an ideal world, but let’s be realistic: The Epic Games Store would have never had a chance if it didn’t make big moves out of the gate to grab people’s attention. I understand if you don’t care for console-like business models infiltrating the PC landscape – I can’t say I’m crazy about it either – but it was inevitable. Anyone with an internet connection can have a digital storefront these days, so major publishers were always going to offer their own… it’s just that Epic are the first ones to set their sights as high as Valve.

I’m not saying you should just give all your money to the Epic Store from here on out though. I still like Steam and that’s going to be my (PC) platform of choice for now and probably forever.

I’m just saying that on a surface level, what Epic are doing isn’t a big deal. You could argue that they should have used their money to create a new and fresh IP, but I’d counter that by saying, “What’s going to turn more heads? A game that people would potentially have no interest in, or a well-established IP?” The latter, clearly. And besides, they already have a good thing going with Fortnite.

So I don’t think the question should be if their tactics are fair or not – because I think they are, even if we don’t like them – but if those tactics will serve them well in the long run.

Through that lens, I’m not sure Epic knows what they’re doing. They’ve clearly been blinded by all the Fortnite money.

In my opinion, they should have stopped at, “Hey, Metro Exodus will be $10 cheaper on our store!” That would have drawn a number of people to their platform AND gain them a bit of good will. Instead, they opted to forcefully swing Metro fans to their side of the table. That’s… not very smart. This industry is loaded with companies that say, “We’re doing this because we can,” and people are fed up with that attitude. It’s why Electronic Arts are walking a tightrope, balancing the act of marrying monetization with consumer friendly business models (and thus far, have largely failed).

Pissing people off may work for financial gain in the here-and-now, but it’s not sustainable. Not forever.

These are the real issues that plague the Epic Games Store and Metro Exodus fiasco… not that ‘it isn’t fair’ stuff. It’s a shame that they’re souring so many people on their platform so early on, because we really do need a company that will be the anti-Valve. Again, I like Steam, but its curator hasn’t really tried to excite its user base for quite some time. Only time will tell, but here’s to hoping that Epic has learned a lesson from all this and will cultivate good will first and foremost.

Dead By Daylight or Friday the 13th? HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

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Happy Halloween everyone! It’s one of my favorite holidays (I’m a sucker for Christmas, too), and I thought I’d celebrate the occasion by discussing two of the hottest horror games out there: Friday the 13th The Game, and Dead By Daylight! More specifically, I’m going to tell you which is more worth your time.

Dead by Daylight came first, and it’s a fairly simple game. One person gets to be the villain stalking their prey, while four survivors must escape the semi-large arena they’re placed in. In order to do so, they must go around the map and repair five generators which power the escape gate. The villain, of course, has to stop them.

One major thing this game gets right is the intensity of the chase. A villain’s proximity can be determined by musical cues, so when they’re close, it’s time to run, and once you’re being chased, you can’t help but sit on the edge of your seat. Villains. Are. FAST. They have that ‘power walk’ thing going for them, but they can catch up to you if you’re not careful. As a survivor, your job is to outmaneuver them by hopping over short walls or windows, and to slow the villain down by knocking pallets over. Of course, these pallets are destroyed in a couple of short seconds and the chase is on again. You’ll feel hopeless, but there’s plenty of chances to escape. You can temporarily blind the villain with a flashlight. Your teammates can help create a distraction, or maybe the villain wants to go make sure nobody’s about to start a generator. Even if the villain grabs you and (painfully) tosses you on a hook, your teammates can save the day… as long as they’re not too busy running for their lives.

Another plus is that this game allows horror fans to live out their fantasies. Want to be Leatherface, Michael Myers or Freddy Krueger? You can! Fancy Laurie Strode on the survivor side? Well you can do that too!

The downside to this game is that the ‘repair the generators’ bit is the only means for escape, leaving the game with a distinct lack of variety, at least on the survivor’s side. It takes a long time for the repair process, too. It probably takes over a minute without any complications, such as the villain showing up. You can also have setbacks during repair as well… that is, if your reflexes aren’t fast enough. Having to run around and do this time and time again is a chore, and once all the generators are started, guess what? The gate needs to be powered on… which is another ‘hold a button for over a minute and hope the villain doesn’t show up’ game. And, of course, because that’s the only way out, they tend to camp that part of the map. Not the most brilliant design. This game has been out for quite some time now, and they still haven’t added any escape-based variety.

Also, if you want to be a villain, you’ll rarely jump right into a match. You’ll have to wait for people to join your lobby, whereas with survivors, you can jump from game, to game, to game, without having to wait.

Still, the thrill of the chase is what makes this game so addicting and fun. Being able to play as your favorite horror villains helps, too.

It’s worth noting that the base game is fairly cheap… $20. If you want to play as these other villains, you’re going to have to pony up some money for DLC. The good news is that players are never segregated according to what DLC they own or not. You can play with anyone on any map, and play against any villain or survivor… you just can’t play as the DLC characters themselves. If you want everything this game has to offer, it’s best to pick it all up during a sale (like right now).

Friday the 13th The Game is similar to Dead by Daylight, in the respect that one person gets to be Jason, and everyone else – 8 people, to be exact – play as counselors who need to either survive for 20 minutes or escape. There’s a small handful of maps to play in, but everything is generated at random. Cabins and other key areas or items will always change up match to match, so neither Jason nor the counselors can cheese by memorizing where everything is.

I’ve never seen anyone last a full 20 minutes against Jason. He is, without question, overpowered. I mean, he’s supposed to be, right? He’s Jason! So, escape is what you’ll want to focus on. Try running cabin to cabin, looking for useful items. You’ll want a map to find other key points on the map, some first aid spray, something to arm yourself with, as well as things which will aid in your escape.

Maps will have a car or cars to repair and possibly a boat. Cars require gas, a battery, and keys. Boats require gas and a propeller. You can also find a fuse to fix an electrical box which allows access to a phone to call the police. Five minutes later they’ll arrive at one of the major roadways… but can you hold out that long? Even entering a car or boat doesn’t entirely guarantee your safety, as Jason can get right in front of you, effectively totaling the vehicles.

As Jason, you have certain powers at your disposal. You can teleport to any point on the map, see counselors outlined in red, or speed to them sort like the evil entity in the Evil Dead films. The counselors CAN kill you, but they’d all have to work together and be extremely lucky. Counselors can outrun you, at least for a little while. Eventually their stamina runs out, and if you chop them up with a weapon along the way, they’ll accrue damage and slow down. Another thing you’ll want to make sure doesn’t happen, is someone finding a stationary radio to call for help. If they do this, Tommy Jarvis will come equipped with a gun and loads of stamina. His job is to make sure everyone else gets out alive.

While Dead By Daylight is quite a bit of fun, I’m a much bigger fan of Friday the 13th. The developers really nailed the look and feel of the films, and you couldn’t really ask for more than what they’re providing with this multiplayer experience. What sets it above its competition is the variety of ways in which you can plot your escape, because Dead By Daylight is lacking sorely in that regard.

Friday the 13th is also on sale currently for 50% off, but I can’t recommend a purchase to everyone. You have to be a fan of the franchise in order to really appreciate this, otherwise you might feel the game is too simplistic, or may not be able to wave off Jason being overpowered. But if you are a fan, you absolutely owe it to yourself to play this game!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!!

 

 

Greatness Delayed Podcast – Youtube Drama and Sony Look Silly

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Mike and Gabe talk about the latest Youtube drama, a Sony PS4 Slim and how it’s not being acknowledged despite existence of a review, and more.

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Sales: A Matter Of Trust

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The internet has been on fire with post-E3 impressions and controversy, and while I’ve been watching and participating in those conversations, there was little worth discussing on my site. My duty has been, first and foremost, to keep consumers informed when an industry ‘wallet predator’ comes along. The sad reality is that the video game industry is built upon unfriendly business models (for the consumer), so I’ve kept my mouth shut, lest I risk repeating the DLC and microtransations Doomsday spiel once again.

But I’ve seen something during a recent Steam sale that needs to be addressed.

This is going to come across as common sense for most, but it’s worth talking about. Why? Because gamers have a tendency to get attached to their favorite devices, services and development teams. There’s plenty of reasons why, the most important being that they want to defend the stuff they have fun with… but there’s another, more personal element they struggle with: How much their favorite entertainment providers care.

“They care about their customers” is a common discussion thread, and is hardly ever as true as people would like to believe.

And no, I’m not trying to say the industry is evil. But facts are facts, business is business, and money is ALWAYS the bottom line. If a model is consumer friendly but proves to be unprofitable, it won’t continue for the sole purpose of putting a smile on your face. So, some models are inevitably dropped, but most get reworked into something else… and that ‘something else’ is typically a better attempt to exploit your psychology.

The good news is that you can prepare to defend yourself against this. How? By learning about the products you’re interested in. Research is VITAL for consumer protection, especially now that impulse buys are just a click or two away.

We’ve been conditioned to jump for joy at the mere mention of a sale. I mean, the flash of excitement that sparks in most is virtually Pavlovian. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, either. Rich or poor, people will ALWAYS chase after a better deal.

And it all comes down to how our brains are wired.

When someone walks into a store and sees ‘SALE!!!’ in monster-truck sized font, they feel compelled to gravitate towards the sign.

Desire is triggered.

Next, their brain weighs the value of sale against the initial price. If the savings are significant enough, they reach for their wallet/purse and make the purchase.

Pleasure is achieved.

Amazing, isn’t it? We feel a rush, gravitate towards our goal, take it, and feel a sense of reward. We then have positive association with sales events, and keep seeking them out or take advantage when they roll around. And why? Because businesses have learned they can exploit sales to trigger a release of dopamine in our brains.

Haven’t you ever wondered why you buy so much useless crap? Dopamine. This chemical is highly linked with desire and reward, so when we emerge victorious at the end of the ‘reward pathway’, we’re more likely to perform the action again, logic be damned.

Steam sales are a perfect example of this. If you game on the PC, chances are good you have more games than you’ll ever be able to play in your life. Why buy so much if you’ll never have the time to get to it all?

The answer is, obviously, that you thought those deals were too good to pass up. Even though you didn’t need those games, you bought them anyway. It felt GOOD, so you acted on impulse. And all in part to dopamine.

Of course, not every sale feels like a win. In fact, some seemingly go out of their way to take advantage of us.

A short while ago, Grand Theft Auto V appeared on a Steam sale for… wait for it… $59.99 (regular price). How could this be? It was advertised as 25% off…

It’s because the ‘normal’ price was hiked up to $80.

Valve says this was an unfortunate glitch, but it matters little in the public eye. ‘The damage has been done’, as they say. People took a ride down the ‘reward pathway’, felt they were being had, and reacted accordingly. Instead of being treated with the pleasure of a dopamine release, their brains registered the experience as painful instead.

But I’m going to assume that Valve were telling the truth, and that this truly was done in error.

Still…

This sort of thing happens all the time. Not to this degree, of course, but it happens, and intentionally at that. Pay attention to those PS Store prices. During a good number of sale events, the ‘original’ price goes up. I wouldn’t be surprised to learn Microsoft does the same thing. Either way, if consumers haven’t done their research, the subtle increase goes unnoticed, and they walk away feeling like they got a better deal than they actually did.

If the sales model sounds manipulative, that’s because it is. Again, not because it’s evil. That’s just how business works.

Every major business takes all aspects of human psychology into consideration, and I do mean ALL. Everything from store layout, to product placement, colors and even smell. It’s all diligently researched, tested, and (once fully optimized) implemented.

They’re essentially treating us like lab rats, with their stores as the maze. If the marketing department has done their job well enough, we’ll go through a majority of that maze to get what we want, impulsively grabbing things we didn’t intend for along the way. The end result, of course, is walking away and saying, “Wow! That place is great! I’ll have to go there again!”

You know, as if it were some sort of accident.

Of course, things play out a little differently on platforms like Steam (since there’s no physical property to walk through, nor any physical product to speak of), but it’s the same basic idea.

Soooo… where does this concept of trust come into play? Why do people feel the need to defend their favorite brands? Are the likes of Valve and Rockstar REALLY above doing this sort of thing? Of course not. EVERY company wants your money, and if they can implement changes to get more of it, they will. To believe otherwise is… is just silly. Especially in regards to this ‘console war’. Both Sony and Microsoft are willing to do whatever it takes to get your money… and people find it’s worthwhile to argue which one is ‘kind’ enough to fuck us the least?

The reality of the situation is that businesses only extend their hand far enough across the table to grab and pull you in. Forget about ‘trust’. It simply shouldn’t exist between company and consumer. The only things you should trust are research and your intuition. It’s a money hungry world out there, and everyone wants a piece of yours.

Consumers HAVE to be vigilant if they hope to come out on top, because this sort of thing isn’t exclusive to the video game industry. No, ANY business worth their salt knows the key to success is to keep customers happy, while not going as far as to ‘give the house away’. That’s why it’s so common to see things like the ‘original’ price go up during a sale event: It makes a larger psychological dent on the consumer. It doesn’t matter if it’s a local mom and pop, major retail chain, or even an internet giant like Amazon. They all do it.

The largest weapon in your arsenal is knowledge. With that in mind, remember that most sales are hardly worth the raise of an eyebrow. Some are certainly worth acting upon, but without your due diligence, you stand to lose more than you’ll gain.

Happy hunting!